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Will You Take Part in Stair Racing?

January 30th, 2011 · 3 Comments ·
 
 

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The first time I heard about tower running or tower racing (also known as staircase running), I was not sure what exactly it was.  Later, I realize it is a relatively new sport that runners has no where to go, but to run up staircases of skyscrapers.  If you actually avoid taking lift or elevator and choose to use staircase, or if you love StairMaster, you probably can take up this sport seriously.

In Malaysia, stair racing is held yearly as the so called Towerthon at Menara Kuala Lumpur.  This 421-meter building has 2,058 steps.  Racers start at the main gate which is about 800 meter from the base of the tower.  In Taiwan, in the recent Taipei 101 race, the winner actually used less than 11 minutes to sprint up 91 floors, which was about average of 8 floors in 1 minute!  Taipei 101 currently is the tallest completed building in the world.  Another few high rise buildings having similar race are New York Empire State Buidling (which has 2,046 steps) and Sheraton Wall Center Hotel in Vancouver.

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Just like other physical activities, one can burn much calories from climbing up stairs.  The faster you climb the stairs, the more calories you burn.  Apart from that, you can firm up your butt, thighs and calves.  Your heart and lungs will get a good workout too.

You may ask why people are participating stair racing when racers can have the same benefits just by running at ground level or using StairMaster.  Just treat stair racing  as another form of challenge. Many try to finish the run in a given amount of time, just like what people do in marathon when they can run comfortably on treadmill at the gym.  Last but not least, some people are joining the race to support the charity cause.

If you really keen to join the next stair racing, you should include strength training and flexibility training.  Climbing up stairs is tougher than going down the stairs.

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The other thing, not all building has air-conditioned stairways.  So, if you really practice running in those buildings, it can be a sauna.  Moreover, most buildings have tight security and I doubt they will allow you to run leisurely up and down.  So, a better choice will be running stairs at your apartment.

Anyone have run in any of these stair racing or tower racing before?  If you have not, will you join too?

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3 responses so far ↓
  • blackhuff // Jan 31, 2011 at 10:03 PM

    This sound like fun. The only thing I have against it, is that one is prone to skip a step by mistake or make a mistake by not running correctly up the stairs and can cause injury by falling onto the stairs. But I guess any sport is like this.

  • Simon // Feb 15, 2011 at 1:01 AM

    This looks extremely good and looks like the health and fitness benefits would be great. Although there is the chance of injury but you find that with all exercise if not carried out correctly

  • L.F. Lee // Mar 9, 2011 at 7:23 PM

    I stumbled across this website while doing a search for info on whether there would be a stairclimb up Taipei 101 in 2011. I’ve gone up the stairs of Taipei 101 thrice: two times for charity (2006 Taipei 101 International Climbathon, held on May 21, 2006; and the 2007 Taipei 101 International Climbathon, held on May 5, 2007) and once for a race (The 2010 Run up Taipei 101, held on May 30, 2010). I’ve also done the Mitsukoshi Building Stairclimb (46 floors) multiple times, which is in the 2nd tallest building in Taipei. Stair racing is definitely a challenge & I find it a lot more interesting than just doing regular out door races.

    @blackhuff: I think you’re more likely to twist your ankle running on uneven ground in a cross country race as opposed to slipping on stairs, as almost all the stair climbers will use the railing for support.

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